Food Defense Fundamentals: Food Safety Modernization, FSIS, and Economically Motivated Adulteration

Food Defense Fundamentals:
Food Safety Modernization, FSIS, and
Economically Motivated Adulteration

Wednesday, June 27, 2012
1:00 to 3:00 pm (EDT)

The Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) mentions deterrence of intentional adulteration eleven times in four separate sections.  Thus, outputs from FSMA will eventually require FDA regulated processors to verify the effectiveness of their mitigation strategies for the prevention of intentional adulteration.

The USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) strongly encourages establishments to adopt a food defense plan despite the absence of a regulatory requirement.  In 2010, FSIS made voluntary adoption of food defense plans a performance objective for the processing plants it regulates, with a goal of reaching 90 percent compliance by 2015.

With the increasing global complexity of our food supply, processors may be susceptible to economically motivated intentional adulteration (EMA), such as the melamine events, as well as actions that could stem from malicious, criminal, or terrorist objectives.

While most food processing firms invest considerable resources in their food safety systems intended to minimize occurrence of accidental adulteration, oftentimes the same cannot be said of programs designed to deter intentional adulteration. Such programs, traditionally referred to as food defense, entail an entirely different tool box to achieve desired objectives.

Join GMA for this informative webinar to learn about food defense and EMA tools for food processors.  In this workshop, industry experts will cover critical issues and techniques required to minimize opportunities for intentional adulteration. Learn about food defense, why it requires a different tactic than food safety, and how to implement those approaches.

 


Contacts:

Glenn Black            (202) 637-8054 - Content Inquiries Only

Audrey Rubio         (202) 639-5928 - Registration Inquiries Only